Cold War Map Assignment Ancient

 

NOTE:  As of January 2016, I will no longer be updating this website as I have moved to an online learning platform for my students.  I will keep all resources available on this site through the end of the school year.  You are welcome to use anything you find.

General Class Information

UNIT 1A: Ancient River Valley Civilizations

PART ONE:

PART TWO:

UNIT 1B: Ancient Greece & Rome

UNIT 2:  New Empires Emerge: Byzantine/Russia/Islam

UNIT 3A:  European Middle Ages

UNIT 3B:  Renaissance, Reformation & Scientific Revolution

UNIT 4: Age of Discovery – Ancient Africa, MesoAmerica & Exploration

END OF 1ST SEMESTER 🙂

UNIT 5A:  Absolutism & Enlightenment

UNIT 5B: Age of Revolution

UNIT 6:  Era of Global Change & Conflict

Unit 7A:  WWI

UNIT 7B:  WWII

UNIT 8:  The Cold War

Like this:

LikeLoading...

How Libya's 2011 War changed Africa

Noble as the cause was, the destruction of Moammar Qaddafi's dictatorship by a spontaneous uprising and a Western intervention has just wreaked havoc in Africa's northern half. This map attempts to show all that came after Qaddafi's fall; that it is so overwhelmingly complex is precisely the point. The place to center your gaze is the patterned orange overlay across Libya, Algeria, Mali, and Niger: this shows where the Tuaregs, a semi-nomadic ethnic minority group, lives. Qaddafi used Libya's oil wealth to train, arm, and fund large numbers of Tuaregs to fight the armed uprising in 2011. When he fell, the Tuaregs took the guns back out with them to Algeria and Mali, where they took control of territory. In Mali, they led a full-fledged rebellion that, for a time, seized the country's northern half. Al-Qaeda moved into the vacuum they left, conquering entire towns in Mali and seizing fossil fuel facilities in Algeria. Criminal enterprises have flourished in this semi-arid belt of land known as the Sahel. So have vast migration routes, of Africans looking to find work and a better life in Europe. At the same time, armed conflict is getting worse in Nigeria and Sudan, both major oil producers. Qaddafi's fall was far from the sole cause of all of this, but it brought just the right combination of disorder, guns, and militias to make everything a lot worse.

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *